Favorite peninsulas - The Laughing Traveller
The Laughing Traveller

Favorite peninsulas

I found out that I really dig islands and peninsulas, and this post is a collaboration of a few fellow bloggers which I asked to write about their favorite peninsulas.

Northern hemisphere

The Snæfellsnes peninsula, Iceland

The Snæfellsnes peninsula is often referred to as Iceland in miniature due to the number of beautiful places to

visit in such a small area. This peninsula really has it all!

Some of the best places to see include Snæfellsjökull, a mighty glacier on top of a volcano, Kirkjufellfoss, arguably one of the most photographed waterfalls in country, quite a few cute little fishing villages, lava fields that extend from the mountains to the sea, bird cliffs, or Ytri Tunga, a beach that many bird species and seals call home.

And this is not all. In just a day or two, you can witness some of the best Iceland has to offer nature-wise.

Convinced? The peninsula is a personal favorite of mine and always go back there every time I visit Iceland.

You can read more from Hugo Cura here: https://breathewithus.com/iceland-road-trip-ultimate-guide/

Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

The famed Kenai Peninsula is in southern Alaska.  Surrounded by the Cook Inlet and Prince William Sound.  It is one of the few places in Alaska that one can drive to.  The town of Seward is the southern terminus of the Alaska Railroad.  The Seward Highway, as well as the railroad, provide a scenic drive from Anchorage.  On the opposite side of it is Homer which is the terminus of the federal highway system.

Kenai is more than a terminus. Most of the peninsula is protected by Chugach National Forest, Kenai Fjords National Park, Kachemak Bay State Park and several other parks.  Along the Seward Highways is the Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center.  This is a rescue for many Alaskan land wildlife species and provides a home for those hurt and injured. It is helping with the project to reintroduce the Bison to Alaska. In Seward, the Alaska SeaLife Center does the same for sea life.  A boat/kayaking tour can take visitors into the Fjords and up close to the glaciers.  There are several hiking trails that lead to Harding Icefield as well as Exit Glacier.  The many rivers and the surrounding water are a great place for those looking to catch halibut and several different types of salmon.  

You can read more from Jennifer Melroy here: https://made-all-the-difference.com/2017/10/visit-alaska-in-september/

Placencia, Belize

Placencia sits about three-quarters of the way down the Caribbean coast of Belize. Actually a peninsula, its origins go all the way back to Mayan times when the indigenous people made their living mining salt. More recently Placencia was a proud little fishing village that didn’t get reliable electric power until 1993. Since then it has become a small yet thriving tourist destination that still maintains its local culture and charm.

The area is covered in palms and mangroves which – along with being surrounded by the sea – creates a treasure trove for the wildlife enthusiast. The peninsula is a birdwatcher’s paradise. Its location on the Caribbean is perfect for snorkeling and scuba diving, as well as parasailing, windsurfing, fishing and just about any other recreational activity done on water.

Less than two hours away you can find Mayan ruins and National Wildlife Preserves which provide limitless opportunities for hiking and photography. I love Placencia because of its small size, local charm and proximity to water sports. They also speak English there, making communication a breeze for those of us who don’t speak Spanish.

You can read more from Cherri Megasko here: http://www.bucketlisttc.com/rio-on-pools-mountain-pine-ridge-forest-reserve-belize/   

Trotternish, Isle of Skye, Scotland

The Trotternish peninsula is one of the 5 fingers in the Isle of Skye, and probably the most scenic ones. I stayed at Portree which is the main city on the island and started traveling around.

Driving on the scenic winding roads towards the Old man of Storr you see grasslands and sheep grazing, which already creates a shift in your mood and you become much calmer. Then you reach the trailhead of the “Old man” and start hiking up the trail. Eventually you get to this very big rock pinnacle, which when you stand next to it, you realize how big it is…

Another special point you should stop by is Kilt Rock – cliffs on the coastline which kind of resemble a Kilt, and together with a waterfall, a nice view is created.

But the highlight of this peninsula, in my eyes, is the Quiraing. An incredible hike, where I was completely alone and nature is just all around you!! After every turn there’s a surprise – either a nice small cliff or a pond or a view of the ocean. I have a picture from this hike hung in my bedroom 🙂 .

Favorite peninsulas

You can read more about my travels here: http://www.thelaughingtraveller.com/en

Southern hemisphere

 

The Cape Peninsula, South Africa

Extending south from Cape Town, South Africa, the Cape Peninsula is one of the world’s great road trips.  The eastern edge of the peninsula creates False Bay, home to a massive African penguin colony and a great place for whale watching. The western edge of the peninsula offers incredible sunset views from massive cliffs plunging into the ocean (best viewed from Chapman’s Peak Drive).

Much of the Cape Peninsula is occupied by a massive mountain range comprising the Table Mountain National Park. This UNESCO World Heritage Site comprises just 85 square miles, yet accounts for over 20% of the bioversity of the entire African continent.  At the southern end of the peninsula, the twins (Cape Point and Cape of Good Hope) jut out in the Atlantic Ocean, separated by Dias Beach. It’s here you feel like you are at the end of the world.

You can read more from Lance and Laura here: https://www.traveladdicts.net/2014/08/cape-point-route.html

Peninsula Valdes, Argentina

If you’re into wildlife, this is place you have to visit when in Latin America. This is one of the best places in the world to see orcas (killer whales) in the wild, particularly in January to April and then in October-December when they come to feed on their favourite prey: elephant seal pups.

You can also see many sea lion colonies as well as elephant seals in the wild here throughout the year, particularly at Punta Norte located at the northern tip of the peninsula. Another highlight for us in Peninsula Valdes are the stunning sunsets you get here every evening.

The main transport hub into Peninsula Valdes is the nearby city of Puerto Madryn, which is another popular spot for watching whales between June-December and to take boat tours to swim with sea lions.

You can read more from Stefan Arestis and Sebastien Chaneac here: https://nomadicboys.com/top-10-highlights-patagonia/

Tasman Peninsula, Tasmania, Australia

The Tasman Peninsula is found in the south-east of Tasmania, a ninety minute drive from Hobart.

The peninsula is best known for the famous Port Arthur Historic site, an old convict penitentiary, that is now one of Tasmania's five World Heritage listed sites. While a visit to Port Arthur is a must, the Tasman Peninsula is also home to an amazing rugged coastlines, with soaring cliffs, blowholes, caves, arches, and rare rock formations.

For a closer look at the peninsula’s breathtaking scenery, take a Pennicott Wilderness eco-cruise, where you’ll explore coastal caves, waterfalls, and towering sea cliffs. This cruise is a must for wildlife lovers, as playful dolphins and sun-bathing seals are often spotted, along with an abundance of seabirds. In season, you may even see a migrating whale.

The Tasman Peninsula is heaven for hikers, offering some of the state’s best walks. If you’re after a fantastic day hike, Cape Hauy offers spectacular coastal scenery. If you like a bit more adventure, try the Three Capes Track, a new overnight multi-day hike. It will reward you with exhilarating cliff top views.

You can read more from Cindy Collins here: https://www.freetworoam.com/2017/02/20/10-things-tasman-peninsula/

Coromandel Peninsula, New Zealand

The Coromandel Peninsula is located in the North Island of New Zealand, close to the popular cities of Auckland and Tauranga but it is relatively isolated due to its rugged nature. The Coromandel Peninsula is known for its laid-back lifestyle, spectacular beaches and temperate rainforest. The Coromandel Range runs through the Peninsular making for a windy, often desolate drive.

Popular spots include Cathedral Cove and Hot Water Beach. Cathedral Cove is a 2-hour round walk from Hahei which ends in a secluded beach complete with a natural arch in the rocks and little islands dotted just off the bay. Cathedral Cove is a must see if you are in New Zealand, a truly Instagramable find. Including in the rain which was when we happened to go!

Another must-see is Hot Water Beach, an underwater spring makes for a unique place to dig your own natural spa in the sand to sit back, relax and watch the rolling waves, even in winter. Just don’t dig your spa too close to the waterline or it will quickly get filled in again! The best time to dig is two hours either side of low tide.

The Coromandel Peninsula is a special place in many New Zealanders hearts due to the breathtaking scenery and the bond the people feel with the land.

You can read more from Jem here: https://littleadventuresnz.com

השאירו תגובה